Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Kultur-, Sozial- und Bildungswissenschaftliche Fakultät - Institut für Asien- und Afrikawissenschaften

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Kultur-, Sozial- und Bildungswissenschaftliche Fakultät | Institut für Asien- und Afrikawissenschaften | Regionale Fachbereiche | Seminar für Afrikawissenschaften | Veranstaltungen | Termine | 02.02. Digitales Afrikakolloquium: "You were everything but yourself, Black Woman!” Reframing lusophone African literatures from the point of view of women's writing (C. Martins)

02.02. Digitales Afrikakolloquium: "You were everything but yourself, Black Woman!” Reframing lusophone African literatures from the point of view of women's writing (C. Martins)

Vortrag in englischer Sprache von Prof. Dr. Catarina Martins (Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal)
  • Wann 02.02.2022 von 16:15 bis 17:45
  • Wo via Zoom
  • Name des Kontakts Susanne Gehrmann
  • iCal

All interested parties are cordially invited!

Please register via the email address susanne.gehrmann@rz.hu-berlin.de to receive the access data for the Zoom meeting.

 

“… foste tudo, negra… / menos tu” (You were everything, black woman… / but yourself”)

The two verses of the poem “Negra” (“Black Woman”, 1949)[1] by the so-called Mother of Mozambican poetry, Noémia de Sousa, will be the motto for a post-colonial feminist critique not only of the male canon of lusophone African literatures, but also of the hermerneutical and analytical categories that literary criticism developed on this subject over the years based almost exclusively on male writers. Reframing the canon from the point of view of female writers is necessary to correct exclusions and deconstruct patriarchal and sexist interpretations that ponder not only over literary works, but also on black African women due to the way they are represented. Moreover, it is crucial to question what I consider to be a persistent coloniality of literary criticism that does not allow for an adequate understanding of the social and cultural complexities of the contexts at stake, as they are depicted in literature, from colonial times to today.

 

[1] “Negro”/ “Negra” is the Portuguese equivalent for a positive empowering designation of Black People and it is the current designation chosen by anti-racist movements of Black People in lusophone countries, such as Brazil and Portugal. It was also the preferred designation in anticolonial movements in the former Portuguese colonies in Africa.