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Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences - Institute of Asian and African Studies

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences | Department of Asian and African Studies | Regional Departments | African Studies | Events | Upcoming Events | 26.05. Digital Colloquium on African linguistics: Participant marking and word order variation in Shua (Fehn)

26.05. Digital Colloquium on African linguistics: Participant marking and word order variation in Shua (Fehn)

"Classificatory implications of participant marking and word order variation in Shua (Kalahari Khoe)" - Talk by Anne-Maria Fehn (Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources, Vairao, Portugal) given within the digital colloquium on African linguistics and languages
When May 26, 2020 from 04:15 PM to 05:45 PM (Europe/Berlin / UTC200) iCal
Where via Zoom
Contact Name

This talk aims to provide an overview of participant marking strategies and word order patterns in the Shua dialect cluster, based on doculect data assembled from both published and unpublished sources. Shua is a Khoe-Kwadi language that has been classified within the Eastern Kalahari Khoe subgroup of Khoe. Notwithstanding the little data available, Eastern Kalahari Khoe languages are commonly thought to have undergone severe linguistic reduction in comparison with their far better documented western neighbors. The present data show that Shua follows cross-Khoe patterns in displaying basic SOV constituent order, differential object marking and a set of semantically specific postpositions to mark peripheral participant roles. While a general tendency for dependent or zero marking is observed, one dialect (Deti) displays indexing of pronominal objects on the verb. Shua differs from other Kalahari Khoe languages in using a second-position clitic, the imperfective marker ke, to delimit a pragmatically marked pre-field slot, which may be occupied by both nouns and verbs.


Adopting a comparative perspective, it is argued that the domain of participant marking provides a good morphosyntactic framework for distinguishing the Shua dialect cluster from its eastern and western neighbors: rather than constituting a reduced variant of better preserved western Kalahari Khoe languages, Shua presents a unique combination of complex features not shared by Ts’ixa and Khwe in the West, nor by Tjwao in the East.

 

- Please contact Lee J. Pratchett about Zoom access details -