Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences - Institute of Asian and African Studies

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences | Department of Asian and African Studies | Regional Departments | African Studies | Events | Upcoming Events | 25.01. Colloquium on African linguistics: Tripartite number marking in NE Africa (Junglas)

25.01. Colloquium on African linguistics: Tripartite number marking in NE Africa (Junglas)

“Diachronic considerations on tripartite number marking in Northeastern Africa” - Talk by Jan Junglas (HU Berlin, Ph.D. project) given within the digital colloquium of African linguistics and languages
  • When Jan 25, 2022 from 04:15 to 05:45
  • Where Institut für Asien- und Afrikawissenschaften, Invalidenstr. 118, room 410 & via Zoom
  • Contact Name Christfried Naumann (christfried.naumann (AT) hu-berlin.de, please contact for Zoom access information)
  • iCal

While the morphological structure of tripartite number marking systems has been widely recognized for most concerned languages on a synchronic level, diachronic considerations are virtually absent in most publications on the subject and remain highly speculative due to the lack of suitable sources. However, a first approximation to tripartite number diachrony can be obtained through available synchronic data which will be presented in my talk in two independent parts taking up two different aspects of historical development. The first part deals with the morphological realization of tripartite number marking in eight Northeastern African language groups (Dajuic, Eastern Jebel, Maban, Kadu, Kuliak, Nilotic, Surmic, Temeinic). For this purpose, a comprehensive overview of number morphology in all member languages is provided allowing for group internal reconstructions which then in turn can be used for group external typological comparisons. In the second part of the talk, structural aspects of tripartite number systems will be examined diachronically. Evidence from single language data as well as cross-linguistic comparisons is presented facilitating various theories on how tripartite structures in number marking may have evolved and how potential grammaticalization paths of their essential elements (e.g. singulatives) can be analyzed.